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How old is the steak that i’m eating?

Over the years the culture of meat is growing more and more, but when we buy a rib or a T-Bone do we really know what we are eating?

The important things to know when buying a cut of meat are:

Race (I’ll talk about it in a future article).

The age 

The provenance (I will talk about it in a future article)

Each meat based on the three characteristics will be different from taste and softness, this type of knowledge allows us to know the cut at its best, giving us the opportunity to know what we are eating and why it has this taste.

Today I will talk about the classification by age, because often we tend to confuse the age of the cattle with the breed, something not to be done since any breed can be slaughtered at any age.

The classification by age

Male

  • An “intact” ( not castrated) adult male older than 4 years is called a bull
  • Young cattle of both sexes are called calves until they are weaned, then weaners until they are a year old in some areas; in other areas, particularly with male beef cattle, they may be known as feeder calves or simply feeders.
  • A castrated male younger than 4 years is called a steer in the United States; older steers are often called bullocks in other parts of the world, but in North America this term refers to a young bull. In some countries, an incompletely castrated male is known also as a rig
  • A castrated maleolder than 4 years is called an Ox

Female

  • An adult female that has had a calf or older than 3 years is a c**
  • Young cattle of both sexes are called calves until they are weaned, then weaners until they are a year old in some areas; in other areas, particularly with male beef cattle, they may be known as feeder calves or simply feeders.
  • A young female before she has had a calf of her own and is under three years of age is called a heifer
  • A springer is a c** or heifer close to calving.

Others

  • In all cattle species, a female twin of a bull usually becomes an infertile partial intersex, and is called a freemartin
  • An unbranded bovine of either sex is called a maverick in the US and Canada.

My Opinion

Knowing the age at which the meat was slaughtered is fundamental for an expert, above all because each age has a different taste and softness, and different in each breed. In the next articles I’m going to talk about the breeds and the differences we’re going to find, analyzing some interesting and valuable cuts.

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What do you think?

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